Mixing the Hanxiang Water Garden photo shoot and another in the water town of Xinchang, I produced "The Legend of Hua"; a complex photo film meshing the topic of ghosts, opium, Shanghai in its 1930's heyday, traditional Chinese cultural and supernatural elements; all revolving around a plot of betrayal. Its plot is influenced by a 1988 movie by Stanley Kwan (in turn based on a novel by Li Pi-Hua (also known as Lillian Lee), one of the most influential Chinese TV writers, film writers and reporters.
For example, a product review I did in December of 2014 led people to the product on Amazon via an affiliate link. That product sold extremely well, and people also bought other things well they were shopping. That affiliate link earned me a pretty penny. Of course, that’s not always sustainable. In January and February I earned $300 and $400 respectively from affiliate sales. In March, I only earned $50.
I left home in 2009 with $500 to my name, a point and shoot camera, and a desire to spend the rest of my life exploring the planet. Looking back, I was beyond naïve. However, without that naivety, I would have never made the first step towards chasing my dreams. Today, I struggle to get by. In a heart beat, my income streams could all dry up. But I don’t worry anymore, I just take pictures and love every minute of it.
Aga Szydlik is a professional culture photographer and a doctoral candidate based in South Africa. She tells us that her journey with photography started with Muay Thai (the famous Thai fight style) which she documented extensively. Based in Thailand, she able to explore South East Asia, onwards to Indonesia and South Africa. She is enthusiastic about alternative processes, analogue photography, Lomography and salt/albumin prints as well as mixed media.
When I was just eight years old I would flip through the pages of National Geographic and imagine being a photographer in Africa. I was captivated by the faces and places that seemed worlds apart from my typical Middle American hometown. Fast forward years later, and I'm living the dream as a travel photographer working throughout Africa and Europe. If you've ever wanted to travel the world with your camera, here's my advice to help you get started and thrive in professional travel photography. 

Commercial travel photography provides imagery for the $1 trillion global tourism industry. It might include photographing destination hotels and resorts, tourist attractions, scenery, outdoor adventures, local events, cultures, and customs. Images are used for advertising, merchandising, and print sales. With such a huge variety of subject matter, travel photographers employ skills across all photographic disciplines: portraiture, landscape, wildlife, architectural, reportage and event photography.
Honestly, I think this is the smallest source of income thus far in 2015. There just isn’t a lot of demand these days. Yes, I’ve had some works published in major media outlets. I had a two page spread from Iceland in The Guardian, for example. But the traditional journalism work isn’t something I chase anymore. It’s too much work. You spend 95% of your time pitching, and 5% of your time in the field. I really only do traditional journalism work these days if a newspaper or magazine approaches me. In 2015, I have made about $150 a month from traditional journalism.
Content development complements your photography and helps you grow and earn beyond your photos. If you're a gearhead like photographer Colby Brown, you could write in-depth gear reviews, or publish post-processing tutorials like Elia Locardi, or write a how-to book like Nicole S. Young. If you enjoy travel writing, you could build a popular blog like photographer Chris Stevens, who writes travel guides and reviews popular hostels and adventure tours, complete with photos.
However, the most challenging of all the tasks involved in producing these photo films is to have the models literally become actors in the stories...not only because I want them to look the part of the betrayed lover, of the returning scorned avenger, of the famous singer haunting her past venues, but because I like them to narrate the story itself.
Copyright © 2019 The Wandering Lens. Unauthorised use and/or duplication of any content or photographs without written permission from Lisa Michele Burns is strictly prohibited. You should consider the information contained in this website and on associated social media accounts as general and consider the appropriateness of this material in regard to your personal objectives or consult a relevant professional prior to making decisions. | Privacy Policy
Similar to geishas, the "sing-song" girls (also known as 'flower girls' were trained from childhood to entertain wealthy male clients through companionship, singing and dancing in special sing-song houses. While the practice of concubinage was officially made illegal, it has recently been popular amongst the wealthy in China as a result of the country's prosperity.

Photographers: Travel (960) Photographers: Photojournalists (607) Photojournalism (562) India (556) Multimedia (446) Events (344) POV (241) Hard Gear (230) Festivals (178) Vietnam (151) China (150) Innovative Stuff (132) Contests (130) Photographers (123) Africa (119) TTP Show Off (110) Asia (106) Soundslides (99) Books (96) Bhutan (78) Ethiopia (75) Afghanistan (73) Bali (72) Photo Events (70) Burma (68) Egypt (62) Leica (61) Mexico (61) Beyond The Frame (51) Cambodia (51) Thailand (49) My Work (48) Soft Gear (48) Tibet (42) Pakistan (41) Audio (40) Morocco (40) Destinations (38) Bangladesh (34) Interviews (33) Malaysia (33) Indonesia (31) Photo Interviews (31) National Geographic (30) Rants (30) X-Pro 1 (30) Nepal (28) Photo Techniques (25) Haiti (23) Brazil (22) iPhone (21) Guatemala (20) Turkey (20) TTP Recap (19) Cuba (18) One Shot (17) Kashmir Photo Tours (16) Kashmir (15) NYC (15) Japan (14) Bolivia (12) Laos (12) Peru (12) New York (11) Phillippines (11) Iraq (10) Ladakh (10) Middle East (10) USA (10) Podcasts (9) Central America (8) Benin (7) Iran (7) Mali (7) Photoshop Technique (7) Spain (7) Darfur (6) Italy (6) Singapore (6) Israel (5) Lebanon (5) Lightroom (5) Pushkar Fair (5) France (4) Mongolia (4) Russia (4) Taiwan (4) Venezuela (4) Yemen (4) Dominican Republic (3) Lenses (3) Palestine (3) Sri Lanka (3) Sudan (3) Tajikistan (3) Argentina (2) Buenos Aires (2) Colombia (2) Libya (2) Mauritania (2) Ireland (1) North Korea (1) Poland (1) Portugal (1) Scotland (1) Tanzania (1)
Bizarre 'upside down' hotel some say inspired the Star Wars... The 'JetBlue effect': U.S carrier's introduction of routes... Wand-erful! Harry Potter fans treated to a brand new 'Dark... Hiker spends six months trekking the 2,650-mile Pacific... Guests are bound to like what you've done with the place:... The world's best tall buildings for 2019 revealed, with the...
Yes, I know that’s a fairly meager living. Especially when spending $2,000 of it a month. But, how many people can say that they get to travel every day of their lives? Sure, I’d love to be making more, but I have no complaints. On a daily basis, I get to see places and do things that people spend their lives saving to enjoy. I wouldn’t trade my career for anything at this point.

Yes, I know that’s a fairly meager living. Especially when spending $2,000 of it a month. But, how many people can say that they get to travel every day of their lives? Sure, I’d love to be making more, but I have no complaints. On a daily basis, I get to see places and do things that people spend their lives saving to enjoy. I wouldn’t trade my career for anything at this point.


To be honest, I do not think I will ever make it as a travel photographer. I love travelling and I love capturing my adventures in pictures. And I know that I have some decent ones, but selling them seems like a daunting task. I think I might be better off as a travel journalist, to be honest, if only because that’s an area where I am more confident (and in a way, this article applies to becoming a travel journalist as well). I have, however, tried selling pictures through microstock sites. Getty Images, Shutterstock and Adobe Stock are the ones I have uploaded the highest number of images to. From my experience, these websites require you to spend a long time creating hashtags and correctly labeling your photos for very little reward. It is great because once the work is done, you can earn money forever. But chances are high that you will only get a few cents, if any at all. I think if you are serious about being a photographer, this one is not an option to consider.
In contrast with most of my peers, I seldom use Photoshop and have never used Lightroom. However, I rely on three post-processing/editing apps as my tools of choice...these are Color Efex Pro (originally of Google and now part of DxO Software, Iridient Developer (the raw image format processing software for macOS, and well known for its ability to process Fujifilm X-Trans raw files), and lastly ON1 Photo Raw ( a raw processor, photo editor and plug-in collection all in one).
The World Travel Guide (WTG) is the flagship digital consumer brand within the Columbus Travel Media portfolio. A comprehensive guide to the world’s best travel destinations, its print heritage stretches back 30 years, with the online portal reaching its 15-year anniversary in 2014. Available in English, German, French and Spanish versions, the WTG provides detailed and accurate travel content designed to inspire global travellers. It covers all aspects, from cities to airports, cruise ports to ski and beach resorts, attractions to events, and it also includes weekly travel news, features and quizzes. Updated every day by a dedicated global editorial team, the portal logs 1 million+ unique users monthly.
My still-embryonic idea is to enlist the help of a local acquaintance who would wear a cheongsam (aka qi pao), and take the role of a sing-song girl. The photo shoot would take place in the streets of Yau Ma Tei, and in the parlor itself. Whether the parlor would allow it or not is an open question that will be answered when I'm there. The owners and clients seemed very laid back when I made these photographs.

Photographers: Travel (960) Photographers: Photojournalists (607) Photojournalism (562) India (556) Multimedia (446) Events (344) POV (241) Hard Gear (230) Festivals (178) Vietnam (151) China (150) Innovative Stuff (132) Contests (130) Photographers (123) Africa (119) TTP Show Off (110) Asia (106) Soundslides (99) Books (96) Bhutan (78) Ethiopia (75) Afghanistan (73) Bali (72) Photo Events (70) Burma (68) Egypt (62) Leica (61) Mexico (61) Beyond The Frame (51) Cambodia (51) Thailand (49) My Work (48) Soft Gear (48) Tibet (42) Pakistan (41) Audio (40) Morocco (40) Destinations (38) Bangladesh (34) Interviews (33) Malaysia (33) Indonesia (31) Photo Interviews (31) National Geographic (30) Rants (30) X-Pro 1 (30) Nepal (28) Photo Techniques (25) Haiti (23) Brazil (22) iPhone (21) Guatemala (20) Turkey (20) TTP Recap (19) Cuba (18) One Shot (17) Kashmir Photo Tours (16) Kashmir (15) NYC (15) Japan (14) Bolivia (12) Laos (12) Peru (12) New York (11) Phillippines (11) Iraq (10) Ladakh (10) Middle East (10) USA (10) Podcasts (9) Central America (8) Benin (7) Iran (7) Mali (7) Photoshop Technique (7) Spain (7) Darfur (6) Italy (6) Singapore (6) Israel (5) Lebanon (5) Lightroom (5) Pushkar Fair (5) France (4) Mongolia (4) Russia (4) Taiwan (4) Venezuela (4) Yemen (4) Dominican Republic (3) Lenses (3) Palestine (3) Sri Lanka (3) Sudan (3) Tajikistan (3) Argentina (2) Buenos Aires (2) Colombia (2) Libya (2) Mauritania (2) Ireland (1) North Korea (1) Poland (1) Portugal (1) Scotland (1) Tanzania (1)
Content development complements your photography and helps you grow and earn beyond your photos. If you're a gearhead like photographer Colby Brown, you could write in-depth gear reviews, or publish post-processing tutorials like Elia Locardi, or write a how-to book like Nicole S. Young. If you enjoy travel writing, you could build a popular blog like photographer Chris Stevens, who writes travel guides and reviews popular hostels and adventure tours, complete with photos.

In 2014, I worked with a major car brand, a rental car company, and a couple tourism boards. So far, in 2015, I haven’t worked with anyone, though it’s mostly because I’ve been off doing my own thing. There’s a balance here between going where you want and where the money is. Unfortunately for the weight of my wallet, I’ve always just gone where I want and only take on clients like this if it’s convenient.
Long gone are the days in which being a travel photographer simply meant you shot photography for a certain travel magazine or newspaper. The world isn’t that simple anymore, and the level of competition in the photography world has never been higher. But still, I’m fairly sure there are more “travel photographers” on the planet now than there ever were — just check your Instagram feeds.
Photographers: Travel (960) Photographers: Photojournalists (607) Photojournalism (562) India (556) Multimedia (446) Events (344) POV (241) Hard Gear (230) Festivals (178) Vietnam (151) China (150) Innovative Stuff (132) Contests (130) Photographers (123) Africa (119) TTP Show Off (110) Asia (106) Soundslides (99) Books (96) Bhutan (78) Ethiopia (75) Afghanistan (73) Bali (72) Photo Events (70) Burma (68) Egypt (62) Leica (61) Mexico (61) Beyond The Frame (51) Cambodia (51) Thailand (49) My Work (48) Soft Gear (48) Tibet (42) Pakistan (41) Audio (40) Morocco (40) Destinations (38) Bangladesh (34) Interviews (33) Malaysia (33) Indonesia (31) Photo Interviews (31) National Geographic (30) Rants (30) X-Pro 1 (30) Nepal (28) Photo Techniques (25) Haiti (23) Brazil (22) iPhone (21) Guatemala (20) Turkey (20) TTP Recap (19) Cuba (18) One Shot (17) Kashmir Photo Tours (16) Kashmir (15) NYC (15) Japan (14) Bolivia (12) Laos (12) Peru (12) New York (11) Phillippines (11) Iraq (10) Ladakh (10) Middle East (10) USA (10) Podcasts (9) Central America (8) Benin (7) Iran (7) Mali (7) Photoshop Technique (7) Spain (7) Darfur (6) Italy (6) Singapore (6) Israel (5) Lebanon (5) Lightroom (5) Pushkar Fair (5) France (4) Mongolia (4) Russia (4) Taiwan (4) Venezuela (4) Yemen (4) Dominican Republic (3) Lenses (3) Palestine (3) Sri Lanka (3) Sudan (3) Tajikistan (3) Argentina (2) Buenos Aires (2) Colombia (2) Libya (2) Mauritania (2) Ireland (1) North Korea (1) Poland (1) Portugal (1) Scotland (1) Tanzania (1)
Mixing the Hanxiang Water Garden photo shoot and another in the water town of Xinchang, I produced "The Legend of Hua"; a complex photo film meshing the topic of ghosts, opium, Shanghai in its 1930's heyday, traditional Chinese cultural and supernatural elements; all revolving around a plot of betrayal. Its plot is influenced by a 1988 movie by Stanley Kwan (in turn based on a novel by Li Pi-Hua (also known as Lillian Lee), one of the most influential Chinese TV writers, film writers and reporters.
The Lower Omo River in south west Ethiopia is home to eight different tribes whose population is about 200,000 and it is there that they've lived there for many centuries. The tribes such as the Daasanach, Kara (or Karo), and the Mursi live along the Omo river and depend on it for their livelihood. The annual flooding of the Omo River feeds the biodiversity of the region and guarantees the food security of the tribes especially as rainfall is low and erratic.  

The World Travel Guide (WTG) is the flagship digital consumer brand within the Columbus Travel Media portfolio. A comprehensive guide to the world’s best travel destinations, its print heritage stretches back 30 years, with the online portal reaching its 15-year anniversary in 2014. Available in English, German, French and Spanish versions, the WTG provides detailed and accurate travel content designed to inspire global travellers. It covers all aspects, from cities to airports, cruise ports to ski and beach resorts, attractions to events, and it also includes weekly travel news, features and quizzes. Updated every day by a dedicated global editorial team, the portal logs 1 million+ unique users monthly.
When you really love photographing a certain subject, it shows in your work. If you've built a cohesive collection of images around a particular people or place, consider hanging it in a gallery or selling prints or photo books online. Share your work with artist's galleries in and around relevant locales until you find someone who bites. Southwestern USA photographer Brett Edge took it a step further and opened his own gorgeous fine art gallery in Moab, Utah. Photographer Vivienne Gucwa published a coffee table book featuring her New York City photography. Just getting started? Share your work online for exposure, and upload it to print-on-demand websites for effortless print sales.
This was a really informative article Hillary :) Just wish I found it sooner because just a week ago I went to the Grand Canyon to snap some photos. I didn't have this article to help, but I found a similarly useful article that provided some kind of checklist of things to do before traveling. If anyone's interested, here's what helped me out before I went to the canyon: http://www.adoramapix.com/blog/2016/10/16/photography-101-packing/#.WFH9...
I left home in 2009 with $500 to my name, a point and shoot camera, and a desire to spend the rest of my life exploring the planet. Looking back, I was beyond naïve. However, without that naivety, I would have never made the first step towards chasing my dreams. Today, I struggle to get by. In a heart beat, my income streams could all dry up. But I don’t worry anymore, I just take pictures and love every minute of it.
Oh gosh, that's 36 hours in the air, Hans? Ouch!! I'm counting total transit time -- for example, a flight I almost booked from Amsterdam to Cape Town had a 2 hour hop to Vienna with an 11 hour layover, followed by a 6.5 hour flight to Ethiopia with a 17 hour layover, followed by a 9 hour flight to Cape Town. Total transit = 45+ hours. Pretty rough!
In March 2018, I traveled to Shanghai to give a lecture and a street workshop at Imaging Group, and recall doing some location scouting in Laoximen with Tamia Tang (my assistant). We met an elderly resident who had lived in her small rooms virtually all her life, and had been told that she would have to vacate them soon. She claimed satisfaction that the city would be offering residents alternative housing or monetary compensation as the weather in Shanghai was too cold for her. 
If you’re interested in creating a travel blog to showcase your travel photography The Blogger Course is the best thing you can invest in! It’s a 12 week course sharing all the secrets to making money and finding an audience created by Monica of The Travel Hack. I’ve also contributed a weeks lesson on Advanced Photography. Sign up and you’ll also get access to a secret Facebook Group that’s invaluable for sharing advice and getting feedback.
For micro-stock, I have portfolios on a dozen different sites. However, I really only publish images on a regular basis to ShutterStock and iStock. Between my micro-stock sales, I have averaged about $250 a month on average. The best part of micro-stock for me is that it’s fairly residual and passive. I spend very little time on it, and it keeps coming month after month even if I stop working at it.

Devansh Jhaveri is a freelance photographer based in Ahmedabad, India. He has been published in newspapers across India, and his photographs were used as book covers for books by Penguin Books. He has been widely exhibited by Pix Delhi, at the Delhi Photo Festival, the Chennai Salon, and the Asahi Shimbun in Japan. He has also been part of two personal solo shows named Trespass and Distortions. His latest series "The Red Dress Project" was exhibited at the British Council Delhi and will be traveling to other cities this year.
You can offer photography services to any business in the travel/tourism industry at your destination of choice. Opportunities are plentiful, whether you're selling your services or offering a trade. Going skiing in Colorado? Get in touch with local lodges about trading photography for a free stay. Vacationing in Vienna? Talk to the local tourism board about shooting a few photos for a fee. I recently made a deal like this in Cape Town shooting a month-long campaign with their tourism board, which resulted in a promotional blog post and lead to even more work. Remember that a strong portfolio goes a long way, and as it grows, so will your opportunities.
As an approved photographer on stock libraries, you can possibly get access to client briefs where you can submit your work direct to the client, meaning they’ll consider you for the project and see your profile. Otherwise there’s usually a marketplace type system for you to upload your images and have them added to collections based on themes, destinations and seasons.
×